Vintage

Old Photographs of NYC’s Bridges When They Were Being Built Resurface by Travis W Keyes

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.   They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.   Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.  In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.

They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.

Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.

In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Grit, Grime and Graffiti: Christopher Morris on the New York Subway, 1981 by Travis W Keyes

Morris recently re-discovered these previously unpublished shots when he read an interview with famous graffiti artist   Tracy 168  , who he had photographed in the 1980s. Now, looking back through his archive, Morris remembers that time as being pretty unique: “I was actually out looking for criminal elements,” he says on the phone, “trying to prove myself as a photojournalist, and prove myself to myself.”    Read more:  15 Rare Photos of New York’s Graffiti-Covered Subway in the 1980s - LightBox   http://lightbox.time.com/2014/01/22/grit-grime-and-graffiti-chris-morris-on-the-new-york-subway-1981/#ixzz2rFNwrFn4

Morris recently re-discovered these previously unpublished shots when he read an interview with famous graffiti artist Tracy 168, who he had photographed in the 1980s. Now, looking back through his archive, Morris remembers that time as being pretty unique: “I was actually out looking for criminal elements,” he says on the phone, “trying to prove myself as a photojournalist, and prove myself to myself.”

Read more: 15 Rare Photos of New York’s Graffiti-Covered Subway in the 1980s - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2014/01/22/grit-grime-and-graffiti-chris-morris-on-the-new-york-subway-1981/#ixzz2rFNwrFn4

Burlesque beauties of the 1890s: Stunning vintage photos of 'loose women in tights' who perfected the art of the tease by Travis W Keyes

By modern standards, the burlesque dancers of the 1890s are barely deserve notice for their attire - tights covering their legs from foot to waist, many wore long sleeves to cover their arms and nary  a spot of cleavage to be found.   But in their time, these women were positively scandalous. Their form-fitting clothes showed off the shapes of their legs and thighs. Their corsets accentuated their bosoms. And everywhere they performed men threw themselves into frenzies of erotic desire.   Vintage photos collected by Charles H. McCaghy, a professor emeritus at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, reveal just how different beauty was 120 years ago than it is today.     Read more:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2114487/Photos-reveal-scandalous-burlesque-dancers-1890s.html#ixzz2rFSCFdf0     

By modern standards, the burlesque dancers of the 1890s are barely deserve notice for their attire - tights covering their legs from foot to waist, many wore long sleeves to cover their arms and nary  a spot of cleavage to be found. 

But in their time, these women were positively scandalous. Their form-fitting clothes showed off the shapes of their legs and thighs. Their corsets accentuated their bosoms. And everywhere they performed men threw themselves into frenzies of erotic desire. 

Vintage photos collected by Charles H. McCaghy, a professor emeritus at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, reveal just how different beauty was 120 years ago than it is today.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2114487/Photos-reveal-scandalous-burlesque-dancers-1890s.html#ixzz2rFSCFdf0