Photography

Thanksgiving in Cuba by Travis W Keyes

want to go to CUBA with me! ONLY 2 SPOTS LEFT!!!! I know it has been on my bucket list and as Cuba opens up, it will be changing, so the time is now to go!! So the trip is sponsored through SVA and if you are like "what am I going to do for thanksgiving this year?" What could be better than mojitos and Cuban sandwiches in Havana?? So besides free access to me to ask a million photo questions, my friend and mentor Jaime Permuth will be guiding us around for the week with Alex Garcia . Jamie is a brilliant published photographer and will act as our guide throughout the trip. Alexander Garcia is a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer specializing in lifestyle and documentary imagery and will also guide us... Aside from our main destination of Havana, our group takes a day trip to Viñales, one of the most beautiful regions of Cuba. This province is where the best tobacco in the world is grown. We visit an award-winning estate and learn all about tobacco cultivation and cigar manufacturing.

So if you want to have an incredible photography experience in Cuba for a price that is ridiculously great!!!- you need to hook up with these masters of the craft Alex Garcia and Jaime Permuth #svacuba and me!!

 

The next SVA Destinations trip to Cuba is here, Nov 22-29. Apply and join us for a week-long, memorable journey. And no you don't need to be a student just a passion for traveling and seeking adventure!!!
Live link in profile:

http://destinations.sva.edu/digital-photography-in-havana-cuba/

 

Goodbye Summer... by Travis W Keyes

Photography by Travis W Keyes   Shorter days and cooler temperatures mean the end of summer and lead us to the autumnal equinox on September 22 (EDT). Latin for equal night, the equinox occurs twice a year when the sun crosses the equator, creating roughly twelve hours of daylight and twelve hours of night.    

Photography by Travis W Keyes

Shorter days and cooler temperatures mean the end of summer and lead us to the autumnal equinox on September 22 (EDT). Latin for equal night, the equinox occurs twice a year when the sun crosses the equator, creating roughly twelve hours of daylight and twelve hours of night.

 

Melancholic Portraits Of Elderly Animals Help Photographer Face Her Own Fear Of Mortality by Travis W Keyes

Handsome One, Thoroughbred Horse, Age 33

Handsome One, Thoroughbred Horse, Age 33

Philadelphia-based photographer Isa Leshko created a series of beautiful portraits of elderly animals as a means to explore our collective perception of old age and her own fears of mortality. The artist finds the animals in sanctuaries after they had been rescued from factory farms. Leshko first tries to make a connection with the animals by watching them and lying beside them for hours on end, trying to recognize their peculiarities and make them feel comfortable around her before the actual photoshoot.

“I am creating these photographs in order to take an unflinching look at aging and mortality,” writes Leshko in her artist statement. “My maternal grandmother has dementia during her later years, and now my mom has it. Photographing geriatric animals enables me to immerse myself in my fear of growing old.”

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'Architecture Of Density' by Travis W Keyes

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Thrilling as it may be, city life has its drawbacks, not the least of which is the shortage of space between you and the guy with the barking beagle next door. But imagine if your quarters closed in even tighter. Now, imagine it even tighter. Still tighter. And then everyday life suddenly looked something like this:

It's a lifestyle photographer Michael Wolf set out to explore in his project " Architecture of Density,' a study of urban living in Chinese cities like Hong Kong. "If you go to Shanghai or Hong Kong or to any of the big Chinese cities you have this tremendous density around you," Wolf said in an interview with New Republic.

"Up close you see a pair of pants, a t-shirt or a mop hanging out of the window," he adds, signs of habitation that become invisible once his photography technique is employed -- cropping out the sky and the land out of his shot to create a natural illusion of unlimited size of the building in each view.

The result: A series of stunning (albeit dizzying) photos that capture megacity life, without the help of Photoshop. “You have no idea how big the building is. It could be 100 stories or 200 stories, it could be a mile long,” Wolf said.

Check out more of Wolf's "study" in the slideshow below and a follow-up to it called"100x100," which offers an up-close view of 100 interiors of public housing estates where every room has the same measurements: 10 feet by 10 feet (x2).

These Buildings Look Photoshopped...But They're Not.

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Remembering the Terra Nova Expedition by Travis W Keyes

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January 17, 2014 /Photography News/ The Terra Nova Expedition (1910–1913), officially the British Antarctic Expedition 1910, was led by Robert Falcon Scott with the objective of being the first to reach the geographical South Pole. Scott and four companions attained the pole 102 years ago today, on17 January 1912, to find that a Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen had preceded them by 33 days. 

Herbert George Ponting (1870-1935) was the expedition photographer and cinematographer for the Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole. He was one of the first to use a portable movie camera in Antarctica. 

Scott's entire crew died on the return journey from the pole. Some of their bodies, journals, and photographs were discovered by a search party eight months later.

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Finally, Somebody Imagined An Alternate Universe Where Batman Lives In Texas by Travis W Keyes

    Rémi Noël 's "Lonely Batman" series answers a lot of questions that until now have gone unaddressed. What if Batman relocated from the bustling city of Gotham to the vast expanses of Texas? What if our favorite masked superhero went from solving crimes to hopping between motels and strip clubs sprinkled throughout the open roads? And lastly, what if Batman was suddenly very, very small?   These are the queries addressed in Noël's unlikely take on Bruce Wayne's alter ego. Using silver film, the photographer creates a quiet, black-and-white series of banal yet surprisingly poetic moments that come with life on the road... and from being action-figure-size. Whether walking down a winding road as the sun sets or getting caught in a can of baked beans, this Texas Batman sure seems to prefer contemplation over crime fighting.   Noël's interest in America's starkest shapes of beauty began years ago. According to his artist statement, " Though a less-than-stellar student in geography, French photographer Rémi Noël has been obsessed with the 'America' of Jack Kerouac, Edward Hopper and Robert Frank since his early school years. "  The ghosts of Americana artists past are certainly visible in Batman's lovely life as a vagrant. Who knew Batman was such a misanthrope?

 

Rémi Noël's "Lonely Batman" series answers a lot of questions that until now have gone unaddressed. What if Batman relocated from the bustling city of Gotham to the vast expanses of Texas? What if our favorite masked superhero went from solving crimes to hopping between motels and strip clubs sprinkled throughout the open roads? And lastly, what if Batman was suddenly very, very small?

These are the queries addressed in Noël's unlikely take on Bruce Wayne's alter ego. Using silver film, the photographer creates a quiet, black-and-white series of banal yet surprisingly poetic moments that come with life on the road... and from being action-figure-size. Whether walking down a winding road as the sun sets or getting caught in a can of baked beans, this Texas Batman sure seems to prefer contemplation over crime fighting.

Noël's interest in America's starkest shapes of beauty began years ago. According to his artist statement, "Though a less-than-stellar student in geography, French photographer Rémi Noël has been obsessed with the 'America' of Jack Kerouac, Edward Hopper and Robert Frank since his early school years."

The ghosts of Americana artists past are certainly visible in Batman's lovely life as a vagrant. Who knew Batman was such a misanthrope?

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Nursing Home Residents Re-enacting Classic Movies Is The Greatest Thing You’ll See All Day. by Travis W Keyes

“Dirty Dancing” – Johann Liedtke (92) and Marianne Pape (79)

“Dirty Dancing” – Johann Liedtke (92) and Marianne Pape (79)

If you’ve ever seen the movie Calendar Girls (and I’m not admitting I have), then you’ll know it’s about a group of senior ladies who decide to make a calendar to raise money. These German nursing home residents decided to take that idea and do it in real life, only men and women alike were getting in on the fun. They decided to re-enact classic movies for the calendar… with honestly fantastic results.

“Easy Rider” – Walter Loeser (98) and Kurt Neuhaus (90)

“Easy Rider” – Walter Loeser (98) and Kurt Neuhaus (90)

Otherworldly Photos of the World's Largest Cave Make Humans Seem Puny by Travis W Keyes

Amazingly, Son Doong cave  was only discovered by locals in 1991 . British scientists surveyed the 5.5-mile-long cave in 2009, revealing a main chamber over three miles long, 650 feet high and nearly 500 feet wide, significantly surpassing the  previous record holder .   Guided tours of the cave  began in 2013, on a very limited basis:  only 224 people  will be allowed inside this year. Visitors enter by rappelling more than 250 feet to the cave floor, where they spend three nights camping inside.  Photographer Ryan Deboodt tells Gizmodo that shooting in the Son Doong cave felt like being in an alien environment. "I always wanted to explore other planets and I think this might be the closest I can get to that experience," he says.  Shooting in such an alien, unreachable landscape has enormous challenges. "The environment is tough in caves and nothing ever seems to go as planned," Deboodt told us. "There is a lot of problem solving down there and so many points where it can go wrong: camera, triggers, flashes, bulbs, etc."  The environment is daunting, but Deboodt uses those challenges to create magnificent images. "Besides the light coming in through the entrances and holes in the ceiling, when photographing caves you have to create all your own light which can lead to out of this world photographs," he says.

Amazingly, Son Doong cave was only discovered by locals in 1991. British scientists surveyed the 5.5-mile-long cave in 2009, revealing a main chamber over three miles long, 650 feet high and nearly 500 feet wide, significantly surpassing the previous record holder.

Guided tours of the cave began in 2013, on a very limited basis: only 224 people will be allowed inside this year. Visitors enter by rappelling more than 250 feet to the cave floor, where they spend three nights camping inside.

Photographer Ryan Deboodt tells Gizmodo that shooting in the Son Doong cave felt like being in an alien environment. "I always wanted to explore other planets and I think this might be the closest I can get to that experience," he says.

Shooting in such an alien, unreachable landscape has enormous challenges. "The environment is tough in caves and nothing ever seems to go as planned," Deboodt told us. "There is a lot of problem solving down there and so many points where it can go wrong: camera, triggers, flashes, bulbs, etc."

The environment is daunting, but Deboodt uses those challenges to create magnificent images. "Besides the light coming in through the entrances and holes in the ceiling, when photographing caves you have to create all your own light which can lead to out of this world photographs," he says.

Photographer captures the expressions of visitors at WTC site by Travis W Keyes

If you've ever taken a lunchtime stroll in Lower Manhattan, you've seen them: Sightseers (and locals, too) with their eyes raised skyward, watching the construction of One World Trade Center. Annoying to some, but revealing to photographer  Keith Goldstein —whose photo essay  Looking On  captures the craning.  Goldstein is a professional photographer who has worked in Lower Manhattan for years—he was there when the original WTC fell, and has watched its replacement slowly emerge over the past 13 years. In fact, it was on his own lunchtime walks around the neighborhood that he shot the series.   According to Goldstein , the photos aren't about tourists as much as they are the range of reactions that the new building evokes:  My intention was to capture a thought provoking collection of expressions, emotions, and the diverse ethnic make-up of the visitors. To see how they reacted to what they were seeing – a place where people perished and a new place that was being rebuilt out of the ruins.  The effect is a little like watching people watch a tennis game—there are a few truly vacant expressions, though even those are funny in their own way. But the really great thing about  Looking On  is how it captures something about a building—about  buildings —that an architectural photograph never could.

If you've ever taken a lunchtime stroll in Lower Manhattan, you've seen them: Sightseers (and locals, too) with their eyes raised skyward, watching the construction of One World Trade Center. Annoying to some, but revealing to photographer Keith Goldstein—whose photo essay Looking On captures the craning.

Goldstein is a professional photographer who has worked in Lower Manhattan for years—he was there when the original WTC fell, and has watched its replacement slowly emerge over the past 13 years. In fact, it was on his own lunchtime walks around the neighborhood that he shot the series.

According to Goldstein, the photos aren't about tourists as much as they are the range of reactions that the new building evokes:

My intention was to capture a thought provoking collection of expressions, emotions, and the diverse ethnic make-up of the visitors. To see how they reacted to what they were seeing – a place where people perished and a new place that was being rebuilt out of the ruins.

The effect is a little like watching people watch a tennis game—there are a few truly vacant expressions, though even those are funny in their own way. But the really great thing about Looking On is how it captures something about a building—about buildings—that an architectural photograph never could.

Old Photographs of NYC’s Bridges When They Were Being Built Resurface by Travis W Keyes

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.   They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.   Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.  In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.

They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.

Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.

In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Pulitzer Prize-Winning AP Freelancer Fired Over Photoshopped Syrian Conflict Photo by Travis W Keyes

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When it comes to major Photoshop alterations, serious news organizations have a zero-tolerance policy, as AP freelance photographer Narciso Contreras recently discovered. After admitting that he had cloned out a piece of a Syrian conflict image, the news agency was forced to ‘sever ties’ with the Pulitzer Prize winner.

The photo in question was taken in September of last year, and shows a Syrian opposition fighter taking cover during a firefight with government forces. In the original, a colleague’s camera can be seen in the bottom left corner of the image, a camera that Contreras decided to clone out before sending the picture in.

The revelation led to a massive investigation during which the AP pored over all 494 images that Contreras had submitted since he began working for them in 2012, and even though no other instances of alteration were discovered, editors still decided to give Contreras the boot.

 

“AP’s reputation is paramount and we react decisively and vigorously when it is tarnished by actions in violation of our ethics code,” said AP Director of Photography Santiago Lyon. “Deliberately removing elements from our photographs is completely unacceptable.”

For his part, Contreras realizes that what he did was wrong. “I took the wrong decision when I removed the camera … I feel ashamed about that,” he said in an AP article. “You can go through my archives and you can find that this is a single case that happened probably at one very stressed moment, at one very difficult situation, but yeah, it happened to me, so I have to assume the consequences.”

Burlesque beauties of the 1890s: Stunning vintage photos of 'loose women in tights' who perfected the art of the tease by Travis W Keyes

By modern standards, the burlesque dancers of the 1890s are barely deserve notice for their attire - tights covering their legs from foot to waist, many wore long sleeves to cover their arms and nary  a spot of cleavage to be found.   But in their time, these women were positively scandalous. Their form-fitting clothes showed off the shapes of their legs and thighs. Their corsets accentuated their bosoms. And everywhere they performed men threw themselves into frenzies of erotic desire.   Vintage photos collected by Charles H. McCaghy, a professor emeritus at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, reveal just how different beauty was 120 years ago than it is today.     Read more:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2114487/Photos-reveal-scandalous-burlesque-dancers-1890s.html#ixzz2rFSCFdf0     

By modern standards, the burlesque dancers of the 1890s are barely deserve notice for their attire - tights covering their legs from foot to waist, many wore long sleeves to cover their arms and nary  a spot of cleavage to be found. 

But in their time, these women were positively scandalous. Their form-fitting clothes showed off the shapes of their legs and thighs. Their corsets accentuated their bosoms. And everywhere they performed men threw themselves into frenzies of erotic desire. 

Vintage photos collected by Charles H. McCaghy, a professor emeritus at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, reveal just how different beauty was 120 years ago than it is today.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2114487/Photos-reveal-scandalous-burlesque-dancers-1890s.html#ixzz2rFSCFdf0 
 

Russian Mother Takes Magical Portraits of Her Two Boys and their Animal Friends by Travis W Keyes

Russian photographer  Elena Shumilova  only got into photography in early 2012, when she acquired her first camera. But if you were to look through her  Flickr  and  500px  profiles, you would swear she had been doing it for much, much longer.  Her stunning photography revolves almost exclusively around photographs of her children and their animal friends on the family’s farm. Adorable children, animals and surroundings that already offer so much beauty to Shumilova’s lens combine into an enchanted world that is equal parts cozy and magical.  Speaking with   Bored Panda  , she explains that her photos are part intuition, part inspiration:  I largely trust my intuition and inspiration when I compose photos. I get inspired mainly by my desire to express something I feel, though I usually cannot tell exactly what that is.  Shumilova told  Bored Panda  that she shoots the images during the day, so as to not miss out on time she could be spending with her children, and then edits the images at night. She also says that she prefers natural light, but loves “all sorts of light conditions – street lights, candle light, fog, smoke, rain and snow,” basically anything “that gives visual and emotional depth to the image.”  In order for the images to fit on the blog, we had to scale them down significantly, so if you like what you see be sure to head over to Shumilova’s  Flickr  and  500px  profiles and browse to your heart’s content. Just make sure you have a warm blanket and some hot cider handy… these photos are likely to lull you into an extreme sense of coziness.

Russian photographer Elena Shumilova only got into photography in early 2012, when she acquired her first camera. But if you were to look through her Flickr and 500px profiles, you would swear she had been doing it for much, much longer.

Her stunning photography revolves almost exclusively around photographs of her children and their animal friends on the family’s farm. Adorable children, animals and surroundings that already offer so much beauty to Shumilova’s lens combine into an enchanted world that is equal parts cozy and magical.

Speaking with Bored Panda, she explains that her photos are part intuition, part inspiration:

I largely trust my intuition and inspiration when I compose photos. I get inspired mainly by my desire to express something I feel, though I usually cannot tell exactly what that is.

Shumilova told Bored Panda that she shoots the images during the day, so as to not miss out on time she could be spending with her children, and then edits the images at night. She also says that she prefers natural light, but loves “all sorts of light conditions – street lights, candle light, fog, smoke, rain and snow,” basically anything “that gives visual and emotional depth to the image.”

In order for the images to fit on the blog, we had to scale them down significantly, so if you like what you see be sure to head over to Shumilova’s Flickr and 500px profiles and browse to your heart’s content. Just make sure you have a warm blanket and some hot cider handy… these photos are likely to lull you into an extreme sense of coziness.

21 Stunning 1860s-Style Portraits of the Stars at Sundance by Travis W Keyes

Every year, some extraordinary photographs and moments happen at The Sundance Film Festival. Photographer  Victoria Will  is no stranger to them, having covered the Festival for the past four years.  In the past, Will has created straightforward (and stunning) photographs of celebrities in attendance, but this year, she decided to try something new—and also incredibly challenging:  "A year ago I had my tin type portrait made at the  Photoville  festival in Brooklyn by the  Penumbra Foundation ," says Will, "and since that moment I have been intrigued by wet plate work, you might even say obsessed. I am fascinated by the slow process, the finicky nature of the chemistry, and the beauty in each unpredictable result. There is something really special in each wet plate being one of a kind. It's incredibly honest."  Esquire.com asked Victoria (with darkroom help from fellow photographer  Josh Wool ) to share her photographs from this year with us. Take a look at this exclusive, incredible (sometimes haunting!) collection of images of some of Hollywood's most recognizable faces.     

Every year, some extraordinary photographs and moments happen at The Sundance Film Festival. Photographer Victoria Will is no stranger to them, having covered the Festival for the past four years.

In the past, Will has created straightforward (and stunning) photographs of celebrities in attendance, but this year, she decided to try something new—and also incredibly challenging:

"A year ago I had my tin type portrait made at the Photoville festival in Brooklyn by the Penumbra Foundation," says Will, "and since that moment I have been intrigued by wet plate work, you might even say obsessed. I am fascinated by the slow process, the finicky nature of the chemistry, and the beauty in each unpredictable result. There is something really special in each wet plate being one of a kind. It's incredibly honest."

Esquire.com asked Victoria (with darkroom help from fellow photographer Josh Wool) to share her photographs from this year with us. Take a look at this exclusive, incredible (sometimes haunting!) collection of images of some of Hollywood's most recognizable faces.



 

In Motion - from Aaron Grimes by Travis W Keyes

Aaron Grimes traveled to Tokyo in November and wanted to capture the busy and hectic feel of the city. By working on an effect in Photoshop, he simulates exposure times that are longer than possible while filming and this was the perfect showcase for the effect.

Using Photoshop Aaron "stacked" 24 frames into one, simulating each frame to have 1 second of exposure time, a significant jump from the 1/50th original shutter speed. This would be an impossibility to do "in camera".

I had the opportunity to travel to Tokyo in November and I wanted to capture the busy and hectic feel of the city. I've been working on an effect in Photoshop that simulates exposure times that are longer than possible while filming and this was the perfect showcase for the effect. Using Photoshop I "stacked" 24 frames into one, simulating each frame to have 1 second of exposure time, a significant jump from the 1/50th original shutter speed. This would be an impossibility to do "in camera". Thanks to Russell Brown for letting me help in Japan, and to Standby Red 5 for use of their music.