Photography

Off to the Lofoten Islands, Norway by Travis W Keyes

Tomorrow I embark with a small group of photographers to a small fishing village in the Lofoten Islands, Norway...Armed with a Canon 5d mark iii, a GoPro and a Drone,  this Is the first outing for my launch of www.eat-sleep-shoot.com . Wifi and bandwidth allowing I will be posting along the way..

 Reflection of Olstind mountain peak in harbour at Reine, Lofoten Islands, Norway

One of the most exciting parts of this trip will be viewing the Aurora Borealis.. This has been a long time dream of mine to see the Northern Lights.  I look forward to capturing the journey and sharing it with you.

OK...Time to Pack!!!

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Birte Kauffman ‘The Travellers’ by Travis W Keyes

The Travellers

Birte Kaufmann was born in 1981. She lives and works in Berlin, Germany. She is a visual storyteller focusing on social and society relevant issues. Her work has earned her several Awards and Grants, and has been exhibited worldwide.

The Travellers

Birte Kaufman: I have always been fascinated by the way photography can reveal moments in life. It was the area of photojournalism that interested me the most and I became influenced by works such as those from the early magnum photographers (as well as minimally conceptual documentary work).

Initially I wasn’t sure if I wanted to make photography my profession, and I opted to first study social work with a focus on media pedagogics. My studies did, however, involve the subject of photography and it was here that my professor Dr. Wiedemann encouraged me to explore photography deeper.

With the his help and mentor-ship, after graduation I decided to continue down the path of photography. In 2009 I made the move to Berlin in order to further my studies in photography at Ostkreuzschule.

The Travellers

The Travellers are Ireland’s biggest minority group, with a size of between 20,000 to 30,000 in population. This group has a nomadic origin, stemming from the tradition of migrant workers.

As this tradition no longer exists, The Travellers are looking for a new identity within the Western European society of the 21st century. Their origin still isn’t clear and they speak their own language called Gammon. To this day, some of the Traveller families live by the roadside illegally — mostly without electricity, running water or sanitation — even though the government has provided halting sites for them where they are able to stay with their caravans.

The Travellers

Extreme Street View: Google Employee Maps Deserted Island by Travis W Keyes

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Street View has mapped much more than roads in its, but sending a lone urban explorer through the haunting multistory ruins of a remote island may be one of their riskiest geographic ventures yet.

Strapped with panoramic photography equipment, this video shows a lone Google employee crawling through rubble, scaling partially caved-in abandonments and standing on precarious roofs, all to document one of the most unique deserted cities on the globe.

Occupied for over a century, and briefly the world’s most densely-populated island, Gunkanjima, Japan (aka Hashima) is now one of the loneliest places on the planet.

Side trivia: if it looks familiar, you may be remembering it from scenes of Skyfall, the James Bond film.

A giant concrete wall surrounds the ship-shaped Battleship Island, giving it its nickname. At one point it was packed with an average of 1.4 residents per square meter of space, almost like an overcrowded sea vessel.

Parts of the deserted island have since been reopened to the public, but Google secured special permission to go off the beaten path and pass through long-abandoned buildings that only intrepid infiltrators have seen in recent decades past.

Thanks to their carefully mapping, virtual visitors (web viewers) can now tour the corroded corridors, crumbling stairs and uncertain roofs from a much safer distance, almost look a choose-your-own-adventure for urban explorers.

Melancholic Portraits Of Elderly Animals Help Photographer Face Her Own Fear Of Mortality by Travis W Keyes

Handsome One, Thoroughbred Horse, Age 33

Handsome One, Thoroughbred Horse, Age 33

Philadelphia-based photographer Isa Leshko created a series of beautiful portraits of elderly animals as a means to explore our collective perception of old age and her own fears of mortality. The artist finds the animals in sanctuaries after they had been rescued from factory farms. Leshko first tries to make a connection with the animals by watching them and lying beside them for hours on end, trying to recognize their peculiarities and make them feel comfortable around her before the actual photoshoot.

“I am creating these photographs in order to take an unflinching look at aging and mortality,” writes Leshko in her artist statement. “My maternal grandmother has dementia during her later years, and now my mom has it. Photographing geriatric animals enables me to immerse myself in my fear of growing old.”

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Photographer Captures Erupting Volcano’s Astonishing Show In Chile by Travis W Keyes

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Chilean photographer Francisco Negroni captured the majestic dance of smoke, ashes and light above a volcano erupting in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle chain in central Chile. Negori spent a night one kilometre from the centre of erupted volcano, documenting the breathtaking performance despite his great fear and uncertainty.

The Cordón Caulle started the eruptive process on June 4th, 2011 and has continued to this day. The eruption brought chaos to the lives of hundreds of families and to ecosystems not only in Chile, but also in Argentina and Uruguay as well. Fortunately, its activity has already decreased significantly.

This volcano is one of Nature’s many reminders that we are only visitors, subject to its fancies and witnesses to its breathtaking beauty.

'Architecture Of Density' by Travis W Keyes

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Thrilling as it may be, city life has its drawbacks, not the least of which is the shortage of space between you and the guy with the barking beagle next door. But imagine if your quarters closed in even tighter. Now, imagine it even tighter. Still tighter. And then everyday life suddenly looked something like this:

It's a lifestyle photographer Michael Wolf set out to explore in his project " Architecture of Density,' a study of urban living in Chinese cities like Hong Kong. "If you go to Shanghai or Hong Kong or to any of the big Chinese cities you have this tremendous density around you," Wolf said in an interview with New Republic.

"Up close you see a pair of pants, a t-shirt or a mop hanging out of the window," he adds, signs of habitation that become invisible once his photography technique is employed -- cropping out the sky and the land out of his shot to create a natural illusion of unlimited size of the building in each view.

The result: A series of stunning (albeit dizzying) photos that capture megacity life, without the help of Photoshop. “You have no idea how big the building is. It could be 100 stories or 200 stories, it could be a mile long,” Wolf said.

Check out more of Wolf's "study" in the slideshow below and a follow-up to it called"100x100," which offers an up-close view of 100 interiors of public housing estates where every room has the same measurements: 10 feet by 10 feet (x2).

These Buildings Look Photoshopped...But They're Not.

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Remembering the Terra Nova Expedition by Travis W Keyes

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January 17, 2014 /Photography News/ The Terra Nova Expedition (1910–1913), officially the British Antarctic Expedition 1910, was led by Robert Falcon Scott with the objective of being the first to reach the geographical South Pole. Scott and four companions attained the pole 102 years ago today, on17 January 1912, to find that a Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen had preceded them by 33 days. 

Herbert George Ponting (1870-1935) was the expedition photographer and cinematographer for the Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole. He was one of the first to use a portable movie camera in Antarctica. 

Scott's entire crew died on the return journey from the pole. Some of their bodies, journals, and photographs were discovered by a search party eight months later.

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20 Surreal Photo Manipulations By Caras Ionut by Travis W Keyes

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Caras Ionut, a Romanian digital artist and photographer, has created a wonderful series of impossible surreal images that inspire dream-like memories and fantasies. His use of natural imagery, soft colors and hazy atmospheric effects helps us imagine that we’re hazily remembering or experiencing someone’s dream. Besides just showing his many wonderful photographs, Ionut’s website also offers tutorials and classes on using Photoshop to create similar images, so check it out!

Finally, Somebody Imagined An Alternate Universe Where Batman Lives In Texas by Travis W Keyes

    Rémi Noël 's "Lonely Batman" series answers a lot of questions that until now have gone unaddressed. What if Batman relocated from the bustling city of Gotham to the vast expanses of Texas? What if our favorite masked superhero went from solving crimes to hopping between motels and strip clubs sprinkled throughout the open roads? And lastly, what if Batman was suddenly very, very small?   These are the queries addressed in Noël's unlikely take on Bruce Wayne's alter ego. Using silver film, the photographer creates a quiet, black-and-white series of banal yet surprisingly poetic moments that come with life on the road... and from being action-figure-size. Whether walking down a winding road as the sun sets or getting caught in a can of baked beans, this Texas Batman sure seems to prefer contemplation over crime fighting.   Noël's interest in America's starkest shapes of beauty began years ago. According to his artist statement, " Though a less-than-stellar student in geography, French photographer Rémi Noël has been obsessed with the 'America' of Jack Kerouac, Edward Hopper and Robert Frank since his early school years. "  The ghosts of Americana artists past are certainly visible in Batman's lovely life as a vagrant. Who knew Batman was such a misanthrope?

 

Rémi Noël's "Lonely Batman" series answers a lot of questions that until now have gone unaddressed. What if Batman relocated from the bustling city of Gotham to the vast expanses of Texas? What if our favorite masked superhero went from solving crimes to hopping between motels and strip clubs sprinkled throughout the open roads? And lastly, what if Batman was suddenly very, very small?

These are the queries addressed in Noël's unlikely take on Bruce Wayne's alter ego. Using silver film, the photographer creates a quiet, black-and-white series of banal yet surprisingly poetic moments that come with life on the road... and from being action-figure-size. Whether walking down a winding road as the sun sets or getting caught in a can of baked beans, this Texas Batman sure seems to prefer contemplation over crime fighting.

Noël's interest in America's starkest shapes of beauty began years ago. According to his artist statement, "Though a less-than-stellar student in geography, French photographer Rémi Noël has been obsessed with the 'America' of Jack Kerouac, Edward Hopper and Robert Frank since his early school years."

The ghosts of Americana artists past are certainly visible in Batman's lovely life as a vagrant. Who knew Batman was such a misanthrope?

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SI Top 100 Super Bowl Photos by Travis W Keyes

In honor of today's big game...Here is a link to Sports Illustrated's top 100 photo moments from Super Bowl's Past...  May your team win and you eat lots of yummy wings!!!

A relaxed Joe Namath chats poolside with the media before his big matchup with the Baltimore Colts. The New York Jets quarterback made headlines when he guaranteed a Jets win despite the AFL's 0-2 record in the first two Super Bowls.   

A relaxed Joe Namath chats poolside with the media before his big matchup with the Baltimore Colts. The New York Jets quarterback made headlines when he guaranteed a Jets win despite the AFL's 0-2 record in the first two Super Bowls. 

New York Giants wide receiver David Tyree somehow manages to hang on to the catch by pinning the ball against his helmet as New England Patriots safety Rodney Harrison hits him late in the fourth quarter. Tyree also caught a touchdown pass earlier in the fourth quarter that helped the Giants to their 17-14 victory.

New York Giants wide receiver David Tyree somehow manages to hang on to the catch by pinning the ball against his helmet as New England Patriots safety Rodney Harrison hits him late in the fourth quarter. Tyree also caught a touchdown pass earlier in the fourth quarter that helped the Giants to their 17-14 victory.

This Lake In Tanzania Has A Deadly Secret. by Travis W Keyes

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Tanzania’s Lake Natron is one of the most serene lakes in all of Africa, but it’s also the source of some of the most eerie photographs ever captured. You see, Lake Natron has a very deadly secret, it turns any animal it touches to stone.

This incredibly rare phenomenon is caused by the chemical makeup of the lake, the alkalinity of Lake Natron varies between pH 9 and pH 10.5. Which is so caustic it burns the skin and eyes of animals that get too close to the water, leaving behind something straight out of a horror film, as can be seen in these incredible shots captured by photographer Nick Brandt for his book, Across the Ravaged Land.

It should be noted the animals weren’t found in these haunting positions, here’s what Nick had to say:

I unexpectedly found the creatures – all manner of birds and bats – washed up along the shoreline of Lake Natron in Northern Tanzania. The water has an extremely high soda and salt content, so high that it would strip the ink off my Kodak film boxes within a few seconds. The soda and salt causes the creatures to calcify, perfectly preserved, as they dry.

I took these creatures as I found them on the shoreline, and then placed them in ‘living’ positions, bringing them back to ‘life’, as it were. Reanimated, alive again in death.

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Nursing Home Residents Re-enacting Classic Movies Is The Greatest Thing You’ll See All Day. by Travis W Keyes

“Dirty Dancing” – Johann Liedtke (92) and Marianne Pape (79)

“Dirty Dancing” – Johann Liedtke (92) and Marianne Pape (79)

If you’ve ever seen the movie Calendar Girls (and I’m not admitting I have), then you’ll know it’s about a group of senior ladies who decide to make a calendar to raise money. These German nursing home residents decided to take that idea and do it in real life, only men and women alike were getting in on the fun. They decided to re-enact classic movies for the calendar… with honestly fantastic results.

“Easy Rider” – Walter Loeser (98) and Kurt Neuhaus (90)

“Easy Rider” – Walter Loeser (98) and Kurt Neuhaus (90)

Otherworldly Photos of the World's Largest Cave Make Humans Seem Puny by Travis W Keyes

Amazingly, Son Doong cave  was only discovered by locals in 1991 . British scientists surveyed the 5.5-mile-long cave in 2009, revealing a main chamber over three miles long, 650 feet high and nearly 500 feet wide, significantly surpassing the  previous record holder .   Guided tours of the cave  began in 2013, on a very limited basis:  only 224 people  will be allowed inside this year. Visitors enter by rappelling more than 250 feet to the cave floor, where they spend three nights camping inside.  Photographer Ryan Deboodt tells Gizmodo that shooting in the Son Doong cave felt like being in an alien environment. "I always wanted to explore other planets and I think this might be the closest I can get to that experience," he says.  Shooting in such an alien, unreachable landscape has enormous challenges. "The environment is tough in caves and nothing ever seems to go as planned," Deboodt told us. "There is a lot of problem solving down there and so many points where it can go wrong: camera, triggers, flashes, bulbs, etc."  The environment is daunting, but Deboodt uses those challenges to create magnificent images. "Besides the light coming in through the entrances and holes in the ceiling, when photographing caves you have to create all your own light which can lead to out of this world photographs," he says.

Amazingly, Son Doong cave was only discovered by locals in 1991. British scientists surveyed the 5.5-mile-long cave in 2009, revealing a main chamber over three miles long, 650 feet high and nearly 500 feet wide, significantly surpassing the previous record holder.

Guided tours of the cave began in 2013, on a very limited basis: only 224 people will be allowed inside this year. Visitors enter by rappelling more than 250 feet to the cave floor, where they spend three nights camping inside.

Photographer Ryan Deboodt tells Gizmodo that shooting in the Son Doong cave felt like being in an alien environment. "I always wanted to explore other planets and I think this might be the closest I can get to that experience," he says.

Shooting in such an alien, unreachable landscape has enormous challenges. "The environment is tough in caves and nothing ever seems to go as planned," Deboodt told us. "There is a lot of problem solving down there and so many points where it can go wrong: camera, triggers, flashes, bulbs, etc."

The environment is daunting, but Deboodt uses those challenges to create magnificent images. "Besides the light coming in through the entrances and holes in the ceiling, when photographing caves you have to create all your own light which can lead to out of this world photographs," he says.

Photographer captures the expressions of visitors at WTC site by Travis W Keyes

If you've ever taken a lunchtime stroll in Lower Manhattan, you've seen them: Sightseers (and locals, too) with their eyes raised skyward, watching the construction of One World Trade Center. Annoying to some, but revealing to photographer  Keith Goldstein —whose photo essay  Looking On  captures the craning.  Goldstein is a professional photographer who has worked in Lower Manhattan for years—he was there when the original WTC fell, and has watched its replacement slowly emerge over the past 13 years. In fact, it was on his own lunchtime walks around the neighborhood that he shot the series.   According to Goldstein , the photos aren't about tourists as much as they are the range of reactions that the new building evokes:  My intention was to capture a thought provoking collection of expressions, emotions, and the diverse ethnic make-up of the visitors. To see how they reacted to what they were seeing – a place where people perished and a new place that was being rebuilt out of the ruins.  The effect is a little like watching people watch a tennis game—there are a few truly vacant expressions, though even those are funny in their own way. But the really great thing about  Looking On  is how it captures something about a building—about  buildings —that an architectural photograph never could.

If you've ever taken a lunchtime stroll in Lower Manhattan, you've seen them: Sightseers (and locals, too) with their eyes raised skyward, watching the construction of One World Trade Center. Annoying to some, but revealing to photographer Keith Goldstein—whose photo essay Looking On captures the craning.

Goldstein is a professional photographer who has worked in Lower Manhattan for years—he was there when the original WTC fell, and has watched its replacement slowly emerge over the past 13 years. In fact, it was on his own lunchtime walks around the neighborhood that he shot the series.

According to Goldstein, the photos aren't about tourists as much as they are the range of reactions that the new building evokes:

My intention was to capture a thought provoking collection of expressions, emotions, and the diverse ethnic make-up of the visitors. To see how they reacted to what they were seeing – a place where people perished and a new place that was being rebuilt out of the ruins.

The effect is a little like watching people watch a tennis game—there are a few truly vacant expressions, though even those are funny in their own way. But the really great thing about Looking On is how it captures something about a building—about buildings—that an architectural photograph never could.

Old Photographs of NYC’s Bridges When They Were Being Built Resurface by Travis W Keyes

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.   They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.   Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.  In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Bridges are designed and built to provide an easy passage over a physical obstacle, i.e. a body of water, and connect lands. As such, they are probably one of mankind’s greatest innovations. Without them, many would probably still be suffering slow-moving boats to get from one place to another.

They are also a source of inexplicable fascination for many, must-see structures for tourists to visit, behold, and photograph; their individual designs, originally intended by engineers to serve their individual purpose, turning them into beautiful works of art that attract people like moths to a flame.

Cases in point are New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan Bridge. Each day, hundreds of people, tourists and residents alike, visit them in wonderment, walk over them, and even leave attach love-locks to them, taking familiar photographs of them like they would Paris’ Eiffel Tower or Yosemite’s landscape.

In those throngs of visitors, however, only a small number know that these two bridges, along with the Williamsburg Bridge, the Queensboro Bridge, and the Hell Gate Bridge, were born out of the city’s golden age of bridge building, circa 1870s to 1920s. This month, as the construction of the replacement Tappan Zee Bridge is underway, a collection images from that golden age emerge, as if to remind us that it took a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to build these structures we idealize so much.

Grit, Grime and Graffiti: Christopher Morris on the New York Subway, 1981 by Travis W Keyes

Morris recently re-discovered these previously unpublished shots when he read an interview with famous graffiti artist   Tracy 168  , who he had photographed in the 1980s. Now, looking back through his archive, Morris remembers that time as being pretty unique: “I was actually out looking for criminal elements,” he says on the phone, “trying to prove myself as a photojournalist, and prove myself to myself.”    Read more:  15 Rare Photos of New York’s Graffiti-Covered Subway in the 1980s - LightBox   http://lightbox.time.com/2014/01/22/grit-grime-and-graffiti-chris-morris-on-the-new-york-subway-1981/#ixzz2rFNwrFn4

Morris recently re-discovered these previously unpublished shots when he read an interview with famous graffiti artist Tracy 168, who he had photographed in the 1980s. Now, looking back through his archive, Morris remembers that time as being pretty unique: “I was actually out looking for criminal elements,” he says on the phone, “trying to prove myself as a photojournalist, and prove myself to myself.”

Read more: 15 Rare Photos of New York’s Graffiti-Covered Subway in the 1980s - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2014/01/22/grit-grime-and-graffiti-chris-morris-on-the-new-york-subway-1981/#ixzz2rFNwrFn4

Pulitzer Prize-Winning AP Freelancer Fired Over Photoshopped Syrian Conflict Photo by Travis W Keyes

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When it comes to major Photoshop alterations, serious news organizations have a zero-tolerance policy, as AP freelance photographer Narciso Contreras recently discovered. After admitting that he had cloned out a piece of a Syrian conflict image, the news agency was forced to ‘sever ties’ with the Pulitzer Prize winner.

The photo in question was taken in September of last year, and shows a Syrian opposition fighter taking cover during a firefight with government forces. In the original, a colleague’s camera can be seen in the bottom left corner of the image, a camera that Contreras decided to clone out before sending the picture in.

The revelation led to a massive investigation during which the AP pored over all 494 images that Contreras had submitted since he began working for them in 2012, and even though no other instances of alteration were discovered, editors still decided to give Contreras the boot.

 

“AP’s reputation is paramount and we react decisively and vigorously when it is tarnished by actions in violation of our ethics code,” said AP Director of Photography Santiago Lyon. “Deliberately removing elements from our photographs is completely unacceptable.”

For his part, Contreras realizes that what he did was wrong. “I took the wrong decision when I removed the camera … I feel ashamed about that,” he said in an AP article. “You can go through my archives and you can find that this is a single case that happened probably at one very stressed moment, at one very difficult situation, but yeah, it happened to me, so I have to assume the consequences.”